Here is a run down of some of the reading I’ve done as of late. Over the next few days I’ll give you the best lines and some quick recommendations.

Book review #1: Simon Sinek – Leaders Eat Last

Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

Leaders Eat Last
Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

This is a good to great read. I absolutely love his information about our chemical make up and how it impacts our behavior. Good stuff. Here are some great quotes from the book that I adore:

“Those who work hardest to make others succeed will be seen by the group as the leader. . . . the one willing to sacrifice time and energy so that others may gain is a prerequisite for leadership.”

“We cannot motivate others per se. Our motivation is determined by the chemical incentives inside every one of us. …. if we create organizational cultures that work to the natural inclinations of the human animal, the result will be an entire group of self-motivated people.”

“…that is what the best leaders do. They share what they know, ask knowledgeable people for help performing their duties and make introductions to create new relationships within their networks. “

That said, while Simon is on the cutting edge of the Leadership conversation, there were times where I found the conclusions without the depth that I wanted. Maybe my sights are too high or maybe Simon is better in 17-minute blocks. He has great stories but his true insightful message is, “We need to feel safe to trust and trust is the basis of great leadership” was summed up in the first few chapters.

Book Review #2: Josh Allen Dykstra – Igniting the Invisible Tribe: Designing An Organization That Doesn’t Suck

Igniting the Invisible Tribe: Designing An Organization That Doesn’t Suck

Igniting the Invisible Tribe
Igniting the Invisible Tribe: Designing An Organization That Doesn’t Suck

I was introduced to Josh and found an instant kinship. It makes me feel warm and fuzzy knowing that others are dedicated to the work revolution. He is anti sucky jobs and pro soulful jobs. Yay!

Here is Josh’s premise:

“In a world where we had to be all things to all people, we could never truly hone in on our specific mastery. That world is gone. Now we can specialize in a way we’ve never been able to before. But this specialization must be balanced with an understanding of integration. Like the pieces of a mosaic which only makes sense in the context of the whole image, our specialized skills will only add value when they are an integrated part of the larger tribe’s mission.”

Because my particular specialization is on transparency and compensation, I only wish that Josh included compensation as a part of his analysis. He rings truthful about organizational design. But how we are paid is a critical component that many people just won’t talk about. But, in Josh’s case, that is OK. I’ll do that. We’ll be perfectly integrated.


Ruth Schwartz

Ruth Schwartz is the author of "The Key to the Golden Handcuffs". She is a high performance business consultant and leadership coach. Connect with Ruth to participate in the conversation. Google+, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube .